Here is my latest photo. "Blackie The Cat" By Chelsea Stark Blind photography

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CC Kitty just hanging out. By Chelsea Stark Blind photography

www.chelseastarkphotography.com

https://flic.kr/p/SPzhhV

Yellow-bellied Marmot Mon”  By Chelsea Stark Blind photography


This marmot mom was photographed at Duck Creek utah in a recent visit there. She was very much “at attention”, near her burrow.  

www.chelseastarkphotography.com

Behind the Image; Chip off the old block  By Chelsea Stark Blind photography

Being a blind or visually impaired photographer I tend to use my camera so I can see the area around me. Not that many people think about using the life you function is an aid to see more of their surroundings before photographing. But I have found that has given me a better view and I get more of these interesting shots that most people would not think up or see. This image is a great example of what I was speaking about.
I was on a hike and was told there is a chipmunk on a rock. So I pulled out my camera and turned on the life you and looked around. Suddenly I saw a chipmunk sitting on a rock. I zoomed in and snapped this shot. Once I snapped the shot I went back and looked at the finished image and realize man this turned out really good. Plus I zoomed in and found out that it is super sharp. When I got this into my computer that evening I decided it would it’s best as a black and white.


Here is a snapshot of the settings and camera information for this image.


Being blind I do not fiddle with settings is much is most people would. I tend to work with the auto settings that are in my camera. I have found that I have gotten some great results just using the auto functions for certain times a day and certain subjects. The cameras I have used are a Canon power shot G10, Nikon D 90, pinhole camera, iPhone 4s, iPhone 6 and Sony a 6000. If you want to see more of my images please feel free to go to my Flickr page at https://www.flickr.com/photos/see_the_light1/.ww.flickr.com/photos/see_the_light1/.

 

I wrote this post for a project called Vantage Point created by a new camera company called Light. They are aiming to get great quality DSLR shots in a compact camera form

www.chelseastarkphotography.com

World fattest bird by Chelsea Stark Blind photography

One summer I was just hanging out at my dads cabin in Duck Creek Utah. It was such nice weather outside. We decided to open up the doors to the back deck and let the fresh air in.  I decided to sit out on the deck with my camera. And see if I can get some interesting photos of birds eating from the feeders.

To my surprise here comes what I would call the worlds fattest bird walking across the deck and eating the bird food that the other birds are throwing out from the bird feeders.
To get this image I had to lay down on the deck nose to nose with the bird. Very happy with the shot that I got. The portal bird was so fat he couldn’t actually fly so he actually jumped down step-by-step off the stairs to get off the deck. I’m assuming that’s also how he got on the deck.

www.chelseastarkphotography.com

THREE AMIGOS Yellowstone National Park. By Blind photographer Chelsea Stark

THREE AMIGOS
A black and white of three horses.

Love" A black and white of a horse. y Chelsea Stark Blind photography

Love” , a photo by chelseastarkphotography.com on Flickr.

Love”
A black and white of a horse.

California sea lion Chelsea Stark Blind photography

Seal  ©ChelseaStark http://www.chelseastarkphotography.com by chelseastarkphotography.com

California sea lion, a photo by chelseastarkphotography.com on Flickr.Via Flickr:California sea lions are known for their intelligence, playfulness, and noisy barking. Their color ranges from chocolate brown in males to a lighter, golden brown in females. Males reach 850 pounds (390 kg) and seven feet (2.1 m) in length. Females grow to 220 pounds (110 kg) and up to six feet (1.8 m) in length. They have a “dog-like” face, and at around five years of age, males develop a bony bump on top of their skull called a sagittal crest. The top of a male’s head often gets lighter in color with age. These members of the otariid or walking seal family have external ear flaps and large flippers that they use to “walk” on land. The trained “seals” in zoos and aquariums are usually California sea lions.